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Fall Lung & LI TX / Autumn Health Lung & LI / Foods for Autumn

Fall Lung & LI TX

Autumn Health Lung & LI

Foods for Autumn


Fall is Lung and Large Intestine Treatment Quarter

"In the three months of Autumn all things in nature reach their full maturity.  The grains ripen and harvesting occurs.  The heavenly energy cools, as does the weather.  The wind begins to stir.  This is the changing or pivoting point when the yang, or active phase,turns to its opposite, the yin, or passive, phase.  One should retire with the sunset and arise with the dawn.  Just as the weather in autumn turns harsh, so does the emotional climate.  It is therefore important to remain calm and peaceful, refraining from depression so that one can make the transition to winter smoothly.  This is the time to gather ones spirit and energy, be more focused,and not allow desires to run wild.  One must keep the lung energy free full, clean, and quiet.  This means practicing breathing exercises to enhance lung Qi.  Also, one should refrain from smoking and grief, the emotion of lung.  this will prevent kidney or digestive problems in the winter.  If this natural order is violated, damage will occur to the lungs, resulting in diarrhea with undigested food particles in the winter.  This compromises the body's ability to store in winter".-Huangdi Neijing Suwen

According to TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) in five element theory the lungs and large intestine are related to the metal element.  In the autumn, which is the season that the metal element relates to, we return to our roots.  The autumn is a time to leave the frantic activity of the full yang energy of summer and start to slow things down and look inward for our nourishment. 

The emotion related to the lungs and large intestine in the fall season is sadness and grief.  When these emotions are out of balance and reside in the lungs we may have difficulty in breathing or bowel problems. 

Herbal Tea

Each organ can be accessed at a certain time of day most effectively.  The lungs are most active in the early morning from 3-5am and the Large intestine is most accessible from 5-7am.  If we exercise and have proper elimination during the early morning hours, we can relieve our body's of toxins from the air we breathe and the food we eat. 

Chinese philosophy theorizes that the lungs inhale the energy from the air they breathe which is then spread throughout the body in order to nourish the tissues and promote physiological processes.  They act as the holding tanks for the energy they receive from the outside environment into our bodies.  They also have the job of Governing the breath, producing and dispersing defensive qi (wei Qi) which is our immune system that acts like a barrier that protects the body from external climatic factors such as wind, cold, damp, so we can't be harmed by pathogenic factors. 

Both the lung and large intestine are responsible for elimination.  The lungs move and transform water in the body, they liquefy water vapor, moving it down to the kidneys, and throughout the body, to be eliminated through the skin pores.  The Large Intestine absorbs water through the walls of the colon, which forms, stores, and eliminates the toxic by-products of the food we eat in the form of feces.  Before elimination the Large Intestine absorbs nutrients and minerals and grows beneficial bacteria which helps break down food and absorb vitamins.  If the Large Intestine is not working well, the entire system is flooded with toxins which results in our feeling out of sorts and unbalanced.

Eating more vegetables, fiber, and herbs and removing cold foods and soft drinks from your diet will nurture your nature in the Autumn and prepare you for the colder months of Fall and Winter.


Autumn Health Lung and Large Intestine

Learning & Resource Center Articles

Autumn, Acupuncture and TCM
By: Diane Joswick, L.Ac., MSOM

The weather is cool and crisp. The sun is beginning to set earlier. The leaves are turning vivid hues of red, orange, and yellow.

Fall has arrived, and now is the time to harvest the bounty that grew during the summer so we can store up for the cold winter ahead. It is a time to organize, work hard, and finish projects that you began in spring and summer.

One of the most beautiful aspects of traditional Chinese medicine is as a tool to live harmoniously with the seasons. Ancient Chinese physicians observed the natural cycles of the seasons and recorded the best everyday practices for staying healthy and harmonizing our own energy with that of our environment.

Karate

“In the three months of autumn all things in nature reach their full maturity. The grains ripen and harvesting occurs. The heavenly energy cools, as does the weather. The wind begins to stir. This is the changing or pivoting point when the yang, or active, phase turns into its opposite, the yin, or passive, phase. One should retire with the sunset and arise with the dawn. Just as the weather in autumn turns harsh, so does the emotional climate. It is therefore important to remain calm and peaceful, refraining from depression so that one can make the transition to winter smoothly. This is the time to gather one’s spirit and energy, be more focused, and not allow desires to run wild. One must keep the lung energy free full, clean, and quiet. This means practicing breathing exercises to enhance lung Qi. Also, one should refrain from smoking and grief, the emotion of lung. This will prevent the kidney or digestive problems in the winter. If this natural order is violated, damage will occur to the lungs, resulting in diarrhea with undigested food in the winter. This compromises the body’s ability to store in winter.” - Huangdi Neijing Suwen

  • Element: Metal
  • Color: White
  • Nature: Yin
  • Organs: Lung and Large Intestine
  • Taste: Spicy
  • Emotion: Grief

A Time of Reflection

Fall is the season associated with the metal element. According to traditional Chinese medicine, the metal element governs the mind, organization, order, and stability. We tend to be more reflective, turning inward to our work, our families and our homes during this time. It is a time to organize and prepare for the winter season ahead and a time to reflect on our lives.

Emotionally, this is the season associated with grief and sadness. It is important to keep the mind clear and “let go” of negative emotions, which can impact health more strongly during the fall.

Lungs and Large Intestine

Fall corresponds to the lungs, skin, and large intestine. The lungs and large intestine are in charge of respiration, digestion, and elimination. Common symptoms associated with lung and large intestine imbalances are respiratory problems, such as asthma, shortness of breath, frequent colds, and sinus infections, as well as constipation and skin problems.

The body is particularly susceptible to wind and cold during the fall. Dryness can cause symptoms of coughing, dry nose, sore throat, dry skin, dry hair and scalp, dry mouth and cracked lips, and hard and dry stools. Adding more nourishing yin foods to your diet can promote body fluid, soothe the lungs and protect you from dryness.

Eating with the Season

In the fall, eat fewer cold, uncooked foods — such as salads — and more warm, cooked foods. Switch from salads to soups and steamed vegetables such as winter squash, winter peas, broccoli, sweet potatoes, and yams. Incorporate yellow and red foods into your meals. Start your day with hot oatmeal.

Here are some more warm and nourishing foods and herbs to add to your fall diet:

  • Apple
  • Banana
  • Beets
  • Bell pepper
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Carrot
  • Cauliflower
  • Cinnamon
  • Cranberry
  • Figs
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Grapes
  • Horseradish
  • Leeks
  • Pears
  • Persimmons
  • Plums
  • Pomegranate
  • Pumpkin
  • Red cabbage
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Spinach
  • Thyme
  • Whole grains
  • Wild rice
  • Winter squash
  • Yam

Protecting Your Lung Qi

Lung 7 is one of the most powerful points on the lung meridian points. It is a popular acupuncture point to use for stopping a persistent cough and relieving a sore throat. Besides treating those symptoms, LU 7 is often used to treat conditions related to the head and neck, such as headaches, migraines, stiff neck, facial paralysis, and toothache.

LU 7 is considered to be the “command point” of the head and neck and is also used to improve circulation in the brain and stimulate memory.

This acupuncture point is located above the wrist on the inside of the arm. To find this point, interlock your thumb and index finger of one hand with those of the other, the point lies on the edge of the index finger, in a depression between the sinew and the bone.

Stimulate this point on both hands with the tip of your index finger for approximately 30 seconds or until your cough subsides.

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Staying Healthy in the Winter

Eat the Christmas Holiday foods

Soups stews, and rich thickened foods support and make fuel for our body in fall.  These foods also warm us and thereby protect us from the fall's cool, damp climate.  they thicken the blood in order to keep us warm in fall's cooler weather.  The seasonal foods of Autumn are the following catagories.

Vegetables-Avocados-Beets-Bell pepper-Bok choy-Broccoli-Brussel sprouts-Burdock root-Cabbage-Carrot-Cauliflower-Corn-Garlic-Gingerroot-Horseradish-leeks-Onions-Parsnips-Pumpkin-Red cabbage-Rutabaga-Shallot-Spinach-Squash-Sweet potato-Turnip-Yam.

Fruit-Apple-Banana-Clementines-Cranberry-Date-Fig-Grapes-Grapefruit-Kiwi-Kumquat-Manderin Orange-Pears-Persimmons-Plum-Pomegranate-Rosehips-Quinces.

Beans-Adzuki-Black-Carob-Garbanzo-Kidney-Lentil-Lima-Navy-Soy-White.

Grains-Amaranth-barley-Buckwheat-Corn-Mollit-Quinoa-Rye-Wheat.

Nuts-Almond-Brazil-Cashew-Filbert-Pecan-Pignola-Pistashio-Walnut.

Seeds-Flax-Pumpkin-Sesame-Sunflower.

Sources-This list was taken from Healthwellnews

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